In which I pick 30 writers who changed MY world …

As a response to this article: http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/2010/06/28/25-writers-who-changed-the-world/ I decided to post a list of the writers who made the most impact on me, as a writer and as a reader (except I couldn’t stop at 25, so I have done thirty!).
30. Jill Murphy
29. JD Salinger
28. Harper Lee
27. Helen Fielding
26. Margo Lanagan
25. John Green
24. Sonya Hartnett
23. James Moloney
22. Penni Russon
21. Kate Thompson
20. William Corlett
19. Agatha Christie
18. Nick Hornby
17. Nick Earls
16. Joanna Trollope
15. Thomas Hardy
14. Cathy Cassidy
13. Sarah Dessen
12. Anne Rice
11. Ally Carter
10. Barry Lyga
9. Maureen McCarthy
8. Melina Marchetta
7. Margaret Clark
6. Scott Westerfeld
5. Lewis Carroll
4. Terry Pratchett
3. Tamora Pierce
2. Mem Fox
1. Ann M Martin
At the moment, I am finally realising my dream of starting an MG series in the vein of The Babysitters Club. I know it will never live up to this legendary series of books, but I am having the most fun doing it. She is a superstar and the day she followed me on Twitter was one of the proudest of my life!
Now, over to you! Do you have a list of writers, or even just one writer, who has had a huge impact on you, as a writer or a reader? I know there’s zillions I have left off. I could have made three lists! I’d love to hear your favourites!

16 thoughts on “In which I pick 30 writers who changed MY world …

  1. Oh wonderful list, Gerry! You have some that just missed mine – Winton & Dahl & reminded me of one that SHOULD have been there – Judy Blume!!! I knew I'd forget one!

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  2. I have to share Lewis Carroll with you and Melina Marchetts (for a recent and jaw-dropping reading of On the Jellicoe Road. Firstly I have a few from my childhood that rocked my world :C.S LewisS.A Wakefield and Desmond Digby (Bottersnikes and Gumbles)Madeleine L'Engle (A wrinkle in Time)Lucy Maud MontgomeryLouisa May AllcottRoald DahlPatricia WrightsonWhoever wrote the Trixie Beldon seriesBarbara Bayntonthen as I got older it all got very blokey and these kind of blokes made me want to write…E.L DoctorowDon DelilloMordecai RichlerSalingerMike Davis (City of Quartz)Tim Winton (for That Eye the Sky)James EllroySJ Perelman.I really can't explain the blokey thing going on there…Cracking good post Kate!

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  3. Karen, sophistication? Pah! Pah to sophistication! Talent and loveliness are worth so much more and you have both of these in BUCKETLOADS!!!

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  4. And it has changed my world to wake up and find Nick Earls has commented on my blog! Nick, I have been reading your books for at least ten years and every one is an event and a pleasure. Having you comment here – and wish me luck on MY book – is just astonishing. Together with meeting Robert Forster a few months ago I can now really say my teenage dreams are fulfilled. And I love your list. ANy list that begins with Dr Seuss is awesome in my books!

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  5. Hi there,I am, of course, totally loving being on your list. Maybe one of the reasons it means a lot is because it feels as though, by being there, I've paid back (or forward) a little of what I owe these people for making me a reader and a writer (and I don't know quite what I'd be if I wasn't those things):(in order of discovery, starting in the 60s)- Dr Seuss- Herge- Capt WE Johns- Alan Garner (The Weirdstone of Brisingamen)- Peter Benchley (Jaws) for mentioning nipples twice and making me feel that I'd suddenly been let in on books for grown-ups- Alastair Maclean- Gabriel Garcia Marquez for sending me off on that magic realist writing tangent that impressed no one but that was part of the trip here nonetheless- Jorge Luis Borges for sending the above tangent on a ricochet- Peter Carey (The Fat Man in History – in 1990 I so wanted to be the person who had written The Fat Man in History)- Spalding Gray (Monster in a Box) for showing me what a real voice sounded like- Richard Ford for showing me a new rhythm and for lessons in restraint (some of which I learned)And then:- Raymond Carver- Michael Chabon- Alice Munro- Melissa Bank- Michael Redhill- Tara June Winch- Wells Tower- Andrew Porterfor ongoing masterclasses in how to reshape the goings-on in people's heads.That's some, at least. I know there are more.That's great news about your novel. You'll have your first copy in your hands soon, and that's a big moment.Nick

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  6. Hi Miss Cackle,Love the list, but can you pleasesssssss now add which book you enjoyed the most from each of the 30 authors.Keep up the good work, can't wait to read your book.

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  7. What a fantastic list, no wonder you couldn't stop at 25! I'm going away to compile mine now …

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  8. I was a 'nibbler' of a reader – I didn't really follow any authors as a kid. I just read whatever took my fancy at the time. I would have to add C.S. Lewis to the list, however. (I sometimes wonder if I've got the pedigree to be a writer because I struggle with questions like this. I feel like I'm not sophisticated enough to be in this business! :P)

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  9. That is a big ask! Can maybe only think of 10!J.D. SalingerLewis CarrollThomas HardyWilliam ShakespeareJohn DonneJoanna TrollopeHarper LeeF Scott FitzgeraldWilliam GoldingMelina MarchettaI will think of 20 more in the middle of the night!Kate's mum

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  10. What an awesome list Miss Cackle!Ann M. Martin's writing played a huge role in my childhood and the BSC really encouraged me to read when I was growing up (despite being 22, I would looooove if you wrote a BSC-ish series!).Maureen McCarthy was the first author I can remember meeting after she came to visit my school and it's stuck with me since.My list would also definitely include Melina Marchetta, Barry Lyga, John Green, Sarah Dessen and Margaret Clark – again, you made fantastic picks šŸ™‚

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